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Introduction to Exercise 3 - Choosing transitional expressions (however, in contrast)
Grammar Explanation

•  Transitional expressions are used to show the relationship between ideas in separate independent clauses. Use a period or semicolon between the two independent clauses; in addition, don't forget to use a comma after the transitional expression.
  • Example: The law promises to provide equal opportunities to all. However, personal prejudice and institutional bias interfere with the application of the law.
  • Example: The law promises to provide equal opportunities to all; however, personal prejudice and institutional bias interfere with the application of the law.
•  Examples of transitional expressions have been grouped together in the chart below according to the purpose they serve. Please note that this is not a complete chart.

To add ideas: To state a result:
In addition, …
Moreover, …
Furthermore, …

Therefore, …
As a result, …
Consequently, …

To compare ideas: To make a concession:
Similarly, …
Likewise, …
In the same way, …

Nevertheless, …
Despite this, …
Even so, …

To contrast ideas: To place emphasis:
However, …
On the other hand, …
Conversely, …

In fact, …
Actually, …
Indeed, …


PDFDownload Grammar Explanation (PDF)
What You Will Do

The following passages contain mistakes in the use of transitional expressions. If you click on the word or phrase that contains the mistake, two choices will appear on the side. Click on the correct choice to insert it in the passage. If you click on the wrong choice, the Answer box at the bottom of the choices will tell you why your choice is wrong.  
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